Chocolate Me!

Chocolate Me!

Lynne Heffley ©2019 Parents’ Choice

A freelance writer and editor for the arts and non-profit organizations, Lynne is a former staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she established the paper’s first weekly children’s arts and entertainment beat.

Me and My Sister

Without using the word “autism,” English author-illustrator Rose Robbins features the challenging but loving relationship between a brother and his differently-abled sister. The unnamed brother is the book’s first-person narrator, observing his sister with both affection and occasional exasperation (especially when he is “told off” for a behavior and his sister isn’t). The boy recognizes that sometimes his sister doesn’t like hugs, so they high-five instead. It’s ok that not all of their likes and dislikes are the same, because there are lots of things they share—and “my sister knows how to make me laugh,” he says. The siblings are depicted in Robbins’ boldly colored, idiosyncratic illustrations as anthropomorphic kid canines (pointy ears, no tails). Robbins, whose own experience growing up with a brother with autism inspired the book, writes about mental health issues and is part of Inclusive Minds, an organization promoting “diversity and equality in children’s literature.

 

Lynne Heffley ©2020 Parents’ Choice

A freelance writer and editor for the arts and non-profit organizations, Lynne is a former staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she established the paper’s first weekly children’s arts and entertainment beat

Folkmanis® Ladybug Life Cycle

Dr. Flora Joy ©2019 Parents’ Choice

Flora has been described as a “founder” in the world of storytelling. The following are a few examples of programs or events that she began: (1) Storytelling World, an international journal for which Flora has continued to serve as editor since its first issue in the 1980s. This journal is currently part of NSN’s Storytelling Magazine. (2) The Annual Storytelling Resource Awards Program, (3) The National Storytelling Youth Olympics, and (4) The Master’s Degree Program in Storytelling at ETSU (where she taught for 41 years and is currently a Professor Emeritus). She has won many prestigious awards, including NSN’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Winterland

Winterland

Lynne Heffley ©2019 Parents’ Choice

A freelance writer and editor for the arts and non-profit organizations, Lynne is a former staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she established the paper’s first weekly children’s arts and entertainment beat.

Winnie the Pooh

Dr. Flora Joy ©2019 Parents’ Choice

Flora has been described as a “founder” in the world of storytelling. The following are a few examples of programs or events that she began: (1) Storytelling World, an international journal for which Flora has continued to serve as editor since its first issue in the 1980s. This journal is currently part of NSN’s Storytelling Magazine. (2) The Annual Storytelling Resource Awards Program, (3) The National Storytelling Youth Olympics, and (4) The Master’s Degree Program in Storytelling at ETSU (where she taught for 41 years and is currently a Professor Emeritus). She has won many prestigious awards, including NSN’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

The Invisible String

Liza and Jeremy, twins, were awakened one night by a storm. “Mommy!” they cried and ran to her. “Don’t worry,” she told them. “It’s the storm making all that noise. Go back to bed.” But they were scared. She went on to reassure the children that no matter what, they were “always together.”

She explained that an invisible string links them. “People who love each other are always connected by a very special string made of love,” she said. “Even though you can’t see it with your eyes, you can feel it with your heart and know you’re always connected.”

The kids went on to ask about whether it works when they’re at school. Does it go to a cat? How far can it reach? Does it stretch down deep in the ocean? High up on mountains? “Anywhere,” Mom told them. And to everyone. Not even anger can break the string.

 

Ann Oldenburg ©2020 Parents’ Choice

Ann Oldenburg, lecturer and assistant director of the journalism program at Georgetown University, writes about television, food, workplace issues and other pop culture topics. A University of Florida Gator with a degree in journalism, she began her career at The Washington Post and spent more than two decades with USA TODAY. She and her husband have three sons and live in McLean, Virginia.

Mom’s Sweater

Warmed by empathy and deeply expressive painted illustrations, British artist Jayde Perkin’s new picture book is a well-informed, gentle observation of loss and grief from a child’s point of view. A little girl who loses her mother to illness can’t concentrate at school, feels lost and alone and even “angry that my friends had moms who picked them up from school.” When she and her grieving, supportive father go through her mother’s things, the little girl finds comfort in wearing her mother’s favorite sweater, until the day comes when she realizes that “The grief may stay the same size. But my world will grow bigger around it.”

 

Lynne Heffley ©2020 Parents’ Choice

A freelance writer and editor for the arts and non-profit organizations, Lynne is a former staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she established the paper’s first weekly children’s arts and entertainment beat

The Bravest Man in the World

Kemie Nix ©2019 Parents’ Choice

Kemie Nix is Chairman of Children’s Literature for Children (CLC), a non-profit, tax-exempt, educational organization dedicated to bringing children and books together. Mrs. Nix, a senior book editor for Parents’ Choice, has a remarkable sense of selecting books children love to read.

Coloreando Dos: Traditional Songs for Children in Spanish

Coloreando Dos: Traditional Songs for Children in Spanish

Lahri Bond ©2019 Parents’ Choice

Lahri Bond is a father, a writer, music historian and an art professor in Western Massachusetts. His published books include Spinning Tales Weaving Hope (with the Stories For World Change Network) for New Society Press and People of the Earth (coauthored with Ellen Evert Hopman) for Destiny Books.

Xploration DIY Sci

Gina Catanzarite ©2018 Parents’ Choice

Gina Catanzarite is an award-winning television producer, writer, teacher, mom and media consultant in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She began her career in 1987 and counts 9 Emmy awards, 26 Emmy nominations, a Matrix award, two Pennsylvania Broadcaster’s Association Awards, 8 Telly Awards, and a screenwriting grant from the Theatre Association of Pennsylvania, among her professional honors.

Infinite Hope: A Black Artist’s Journey from World War II to Peace

Kemie Nix ©2019 Parents’ Choice

Kemie Nix is Chairman of Children’s Literature for Children (CLC), a non-profit, tax-exempt, educational organization dedicated to bringing children and books together. Mrs. Nix, a senior book editor for Parents’ Choice, has a remarkable sense of selecting books children love to read.

Baby on the Subway

Aided and abetted by a phenomenal band of Jazz players, award-winning, Brooklyn-based singer Camille Harris returns for her fourth release. Sometimes billed as “Silly Jazz,” Harris mixes interesting reinterpretations of classic children’s songs with some nice original compositions, as in her “straight” singing of “The Muffin Man” before launching into her stylish jazz rap and trumpet fueled sequel. “Jiggly Wigggly” is sure to get kids up and moving, and she cleverly expands the basic “Chopsticks” melody to create a song about a favorite Asian restaurant and eating etiquette.  “Procrastination Song (Untitled)” is a witty little ode to that which we all do too much, and her interpretation of “The Wheels On The Bus” is aided by bouncy bass, expressive percussion and voice-like horns. She even pulls out a Broadway-style rock anthem in her subterranean observations of a loving family on “Baby On The Subway.”  Classic lounge jazz is employed for her tale told by “The Aegean Sea,” and her expansion of the classic “Itsy Bitsy Spider” wed with her original “Get Up and Try Again” transform the song into a parable about persistence. Dixieland Jazz is used to spice up the perennial animal sound making song “Old McDonald.” Elsewhere, “The Backwards Alphabet” takes the challenge of reverse reciting of one’s ABC’s and makes it more manageable with a New Orleans-style backing. A medley of Twinkle Twinkle/Baa Baa Black Sheep/ABC’s” alternates between Reggae, a piano jazz two-step and a swinging alphabet workout. A sweet “Lullaby” finishes this CD, which will have children bopping along and jazz loving parents wanting to hear the recording again and again.

 

Lahri Bond ©2020 Parents’ Choice

Lahri Bond is a father, a writer, music historian and an art professor in Western Massachusetts. His published books include Spinning Tales Weaving Hope (with the Stories For World Change Network) for New Society Press and People of the Earth (coauthored with Ellen Evert Hopman) for Destiny Books.

Rock the Park

Ann Oldenburg ©2018 Parents’ Choice

Ann Oldenburg, lecturer and interim director of the journalism program at Georgetown University, writes about television, food, workplace issues and other pop culture topics. A University of Florida Gator with a degree in journalism, she began her career at The Washington Post and spent more than two decades with USA TODAY. She and her husband have three sons and live in McLean, Virginia.

En La Radio

Lynne Heffley ©2019 Parents’ Choice

A freelance writer and editor for the arts and non-profit organizations, Lynne is a former staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, where she established the paper’s first weekly children’s arts and entertainment beat.